Ultra Sound Therapy

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Ultra Sound Therapy

 

Ultra Sound Therapy

Therapist – Karen

Consultation and First Treatment | 60 mins | £62.50

Ultra Sound Treatment | 20 mins | £20

How does Ultrasound help with injuries?
Therapeutic Ultrasound is probably the most commonly used electrotherapy equipment, but what does it do?
Ultrasound is a form of mechanical energy, it is not electrical energy, so strictly speaking, it isn’t electrotherapy.  Ultrasound works in a manual way. The mechanical vibration produces sound energy and this produces high frequency sound waves. These sound waves agitate and ‘excite’ cells in a mechanical way, in a similar way that the wind would agitate leaves on a tree. The effect of this on cells though, is to make the cells work harder and more efficiently to stimulate and enhance healing. By ‘exciting’ the cell, it increases the activity levels within it and promotes healing.  Tissues will naturally have resistance to the passage of sound waves so we use a special type of gel that conducts the sound waves between the ultrasound head and the skin to allow the sound waves to pass through to reach the deeper tissues.  Most of us have experienced the effect of very loud music beating against our chest. Turn the volume down and the sound waves cannot be felt. Opera singers are able to break a glass by reaching certain notes.
Altering the intensity of the sound waves allows the ultrasound waves to reach different areas. So, for example, we would use different intensity on a large muscle compared to an elbow joint. Depending on which tissues are being targeted will depend on the intensity of the sound waves.
It is believed that ultrasound can enhance the quality of repair to tissue and the normal physiological processes as well as speeding up the rate of healing by 10-15%.

When can Ultrasound be used on an injury?
Ultrasound can be used once the injury has stopped bleeding so within about 12 hours of the injury.  The first phase of healing causes an inflammatory response and this phase is essential for the effective repair to the tissue. The more efficiently this process happens the sooner the next phase of healing can begin. In this phase ultrasound can be used at a low intensity to enhance the inflammatory response.
The next phase of healing is called proliferation. This happens when the site of the injury has been ‘cleaned’ by specialist cells and allows scar tissue to build.  For instance, if you cut yourself, the injury forms a scab firstly to seal the injury and prevent infection. The scab falls off once the new tissue has formed. Again, ultrasound is used to enhance this process as the scar tissue develops.  The final phase is referred to as the remodelling phase. This is one of the wonders of nature and our body as the scar tissue takes on the characteristics of the parent tissue. This phase can last months or even years. Again, ultrasound can greatly enhance this process, so even old injuries respond positively to ultrasound.  Ultrasound is not a treatment that replaces other types of therapeutic intervention, and deep tissue or other forms of massage are highly beneficial to the process of healing and remodelling tissue.